Topic
Type

*** NEW *** Foreword: Spiritual Formation as if the Church Mattered

Christianity / Foreword/Afterword

James Wilhoit has written a book of special urgency for our times. In it he addresses the central problem facing the contemporary church in the Western world and world-wide, the problem of how routinely to lead its members through a path of spiritual, moral and personal transformation that brings them into authentic Christlikeness in every aspect of their lives.


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*** NEW *** Introduction: The Post-Evangelical

Christianity / Foreword/Afterword

Dave Tomlinson addresses a group of serious contemporary problems for the Christian Way, involving issues that are much deeper and broader than the title suggests. But they are problems that have a very special significance for where what is now called “Evangelicalism” is in its historical day in the sun.


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*** NEW *** How to Make 'Professional Ethics' Ethics

Christianity / Lecture

Professional integrity is not merely rule-righteousness over the neatly segregated professional side of our lives.


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A Heart-Felt Word to Pastors and Leaders

Christianity / Lecture

The key to understanding the teachings of Jesus still remains: Loving our neighbor as ourselves in the power of God. And when you think about what that means, you realize that if that were done, almost every problem that we have in our cities would be solved. All we have to do is to simply follow Jesus’ words.


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Absurdity of 'Thinking in Language', The

Philosophy / Article

Among the principal assumptions of major portions of philosophy in recent decades have been: (1) That philosophy somehow consists of (some sort of) logic, and (2) that logic is a study of and theory about (some sort of) language. There, of course, follows from these a third assumption: (3) That philosophy is a study of and theory about (some sort of) language--though this implication should not be taken as representing any phase of the historical development of recent philosophizing. Instead of listing these three points as assumptions, it would probably be more correct to regard them as categories or complexes of assumptions; or perhaps, more vaguely still, as 'tendencies' or proclivities of recent philosophical thinking. But precision of these points need not be put in issue here, as this paper does not seek any large-scale resolution of the problem area in question.


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Against Nominalism

Philosophy / Article

But Nominalism by no means has as easy a time of it as the foregoing might suggest.

First, that we sometimes intuit identities where they do not exist no more implies that such identities do not exist at all than the fact that we sometimes see trees where they do not exist (as in double vision) implies that trees do not exist.

Second, Hartshorne's view that no two things have the same color (or hue) implies that there are as many colors (or hues) as there are colored things. You only have to think for a moment about how many black, white, blue, etc. things there are to see how implausible that is. Are there really as many colors (or even hues) associated with, say, blackness as there are black things?


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Apologetics Glossary

Christianity / Philosophy / Handout

This glossary accompanies The Allure of Gentleness, HarperOne, 2015.


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Apologetics in Action

Christianity / Article

IMPORTANT NOTE FROM DR. WILLARD ABOUT THIS ARTICLE:

I've been told that in this article I seem to say that a Buddhist who is a good person can "be saved" without accepting Jesus. This appears to be a fairly strong inclusivist statement. For those concerned, my response is as follows:


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Apprentices, The

Christianity / Article

What is spiritual formation? And how does a church do it? A professor and pastor discuss the new language of making disciples.

Above the entrance to the philosophy department at the University of Southern California, where Dallas Willard has taught for forty years, is a figure of Diogenes. The fourth century B.C. philosopher was known to carry a lamp through the streets of Athens in the daylight in search of one honest man. To some Diogenes was a madman; to others he was a provocative revealer of truth.


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Attaining Objectivity: Phenomenological Reduction and the Private Language Argument

Philosophy / Article

Twentieth Century philosophical thought has expressed itself for the most part through two great Movements: the phenomenological and the analytical. Each movement originated in reaction against idealistic—or at least anti-realistic—views of "the world". And each has collapsed back into an idealism not different in effect from that which it initially rejected. Both movements began with an appeal to meanings or concepts, regarded as objective realities capable of entering the flow of experience without loss of their objective status or of their power to reveal to us an objective world as it would be if there were no subjective apprehensions of it. Both movements ended with a surrender of the objectivity of meanings and concepts in this strong sense, coming to treat them as at most more-or-less shareable components of a somehow communalized experience, but in any case incapable of revealing how things are irrespective of actual human experience. For the...


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