A Call to Kingdom Community (Everything in Common)

May 26, 2002
Langham Place All Souls Church - London

Originally titled, "Everything in Common," this sermon was preached at All Souls Church Langham Place. Dallas sets a vision for a distinct community made up of God's people living in the character and power of God, the kingdom of God, as described in Acts 2:42-48.

Resources

A Call to Kingdom Community (Everything in Common)

Dallas highlights the transformative power of the Kingdom of God, as exemplified in the early Christian community's practices described in the book of Acts. He focuses on the profound unity and generosity that characterized these believers, who shared all they had, reflecting God's rule through their lives. Dallas contrasts this with purely human attempts to establish order, emphasizing that true community and spiritual fulfillment are found only within God's reign. He challenges listeners to embrace a life of discipline, grace, and active participation in God's work.

A Call to Kingdom Community (Everything in Common)

Highlights:

  • Kingdom of God in Action: Dallas opens with the early Christian community's example from Acts, showcasing their devotion, unity, and the miraculous signs that followed them. He positions this as the embodiment of the Kingdom of God, where divine actions guide and transform human community life.
  • Promise of Community: Dallas emphasizes the human longing for a safe, meaningful community and argues that the Kingdom of God fulfills this desire. He explores how the biblical narrative, from Genesis to the Pentecost, illustrates God's plan to establish a divine community among humans, contrasting it with the failure of human attempts to create lasting unity.
  • Power of the Holy Spirit: The discussion highlights the pivotal role of the Holy Spirit in enabling the early Christians to live out the Kingdom of God. Dallas discusses the empowerment the Holy Spirit provides, not as a means to gain traditional forms of power or position, but to live in a way that reflects God's love and governance.Discipline and Grace: Dallas asserts the importance of disciplines in the Christian life, clarifying that they are not contrary to grace but provide pathways to receive it more fully.
  • New Type of Community: The Kingdom of God fosters a unique community that transcends ethnic, cultural, and social differences. Dallas points out the radical inclusivity and generosity of the early church, arguing that this model is not a human construct but a divine orchestration.
  • Continuing Exodus: Dallas concludes by likening the Christian mission to an ongoing exodus, where believers are called out to form a distinct community that stands as a beacon of hope and light against the backdrop of a dark world.