Willard-Hildebrand Colloquium 2023

On June 7-9, 2023, Westmont College hosted a colloquium to study and compare the ethical and moral teachings of Dallas Willard and Dietrich von Hildebrand. Colloquium participants had been studying the work of these two men together for 3 years leading up to this gathering. This event was co-sponsored the the Hildebrand Project, the Martin Institute, and Dallas Willard Ministries.

Resources

1: James Beauregard - Corporeality, the Body, and Moral Knowledge

This is the opening session of the 2023 Colloquium hosted by Westmont College to study and compare the ethical and moral writings of Dallas Willard and Dietrich von Hildebrand. 

Beauregard is a Lecturer in the psychology doctoral program at Rivier University, Nashua, New Hampshire where he teachers neuropsychology, biological bases of behavior and Aging. His research interests are in the fields of neuroethics and personalist philosophy including the intersection of these two areas as they impact our understandings of personhood. He is a member of the National Academy of Neuropsychology, British Personalist Forum, the American Catholic Philosophical Association, and the International Neuroethics Society. 

Tim Mosteller (Commentator) is a professor of philosophy at California Baptist University. He is the author of several books including Theories of Truth: An Introduction, which is dedicated to his teacher and mentor Dallas Willard.

2: Steve Porter - The Effects of the Disappearance of Moral Knowledge on Virtue Acquisition

This is the second session of the 2023 Colloquium hosted by Westmont College to study and compare the ethical and moral writings of Dallas Willard and Dietrich von Hildebrand. 

Steve Porter (Presenter) is a Senior Research Fellow and Executive Director of the Martin Institute, and an affiliate Professor of Theology and Spiritual Formation at Biola University. He completed his Ph.D. in philosophy at the University of Southern California under Dallas Willard and M.Phil. in philosophical theology at the University of Oxford under Richard Swinburne. Steve teaches and writes in Christian spiritual formation, the doctrine of sanctification, the integration of psychology and theology, and philosophical theology. He has authored many books, is the editor of The Journal of Spiritual Formation and Soul Care, and is a co-editor of Dallas Willard’s final academic book: The Disappearance of Moral Knowledge

Adam Brown (Commentator) received his M.A. in Philosophy from the Talbot School of Theology and is currently pursuing an M.Div. on a scholarship while serving on staff at a PCA church in Orange, CA. He has a passion for phenomenology, virtue ethics, and spiritual formation from a Reformed perspective. One of his ongoing projects is recovering the biblical and spiritual priority of gentleness in an increasingly postmodern world.

3: Walter Hopp - Drifting Into Goodness

Walter Hopp (Presenter) studied philosophy at USC from 1999-2005, where Dallas Willard was his dissertation advisor. According to Walter, “No one has exercised a comparable influence on my philosophical thinking, and I would like to think of my own work as a continuation of Dallas’s own distinctive brand of realist phenomenology.” Walter is a professor of philosophy at Boston University, and in 2020 he published Phenomenology: A Contemporary Introduction, wherein he develops a realist reading of Husserl’s phenomenology in line with Dallas’s interpretation. 

Joe Gorra (Commentator) ideates, innovates, and educates among various types of institutional leaders and practitioners that are attuned to questions of human life and its flourishing in a pluralistic society. His research with Veritas Life Center intersects with habits of mind animated by the Bible, philosophy, theology, history, entrepreneurship, and he regularly enjoys leading communities of learners to read the Bible together out loud. Joe is a contributing author or editor for various publications, including the Journal of Spiritual Formation & Soul Care, the Journal of Markets and Morality, Philosophia Christi, and the Christian Research Journal

This is the third session of the 2023 Colloquium hosted by Westmont College to study and compare the ethical and moral writings of Dallas Willard and Dietrich von Hildebrand.

4: Dan Sheffler - Mediating Institutions and Hildebrandian Value Response

Dan Sheffler (Presenter) is a Catholic philosopher who specializes in the history of ideas, especially beauty, personhood, and conservatism. He is particularly interested in the history of the Platonic tradition and the personalism of Dietrich von Hildebrand, is an associated scholar with the Hildebrand Project, and teaches philosophy at Memoria College. Dan passionate about classical education, and writes about topics such as beauty, virtue, truth, education, and sanctity. 

Aaron Preston (Commentator) is a Professor of Philosophy at Valparaiso University. He studied classics (B.A.) and theology (M.Th.) before earning his PH.D. in philosophy under Dallas Willard at USC. His early work developed a historical and metaphilosophical critique of the analytic tradition in philosophy, related to its role in what Dallas called “the disappearance of moral knowledge,” and he later helped to complete and publish Dallas’s final academic book on this topic: The Disappearance of Moral Knowledge (Routledge, 2018). 

This is the fifth session of the 2023 Colloquium hosted by Westmont College to study and compare the ethical and moral writings of Dallas Willard and Dietrich von Hildebrand.

5: Paul Nedelisky - The Engines of the Zeitgeist: How the Old Moral Knowledge Has Been Replaced

This is the final session of the 2023 Colloquium hosted by Westmont College to study and compare the ethical and moral writings of Dallas Willard and Dietrich von Hildebrand. 

Paul Nedelisky (Presenter) is an Assistant Director and a Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture and a professor of philosophy at James Madison University. He is also coauthor, with James Davison Hunter, of Science and the Good: The Tragic Quest for the Foundations of Morality. His research interests center on issues in metaphysics and ethics. His work in metaphysics concerns the nature of the fundamental constituents of reality—the basic building blocks of the world. 

Thomas Albert (Tal) Howard (Commentator) is Professor of Humanities and History and holder of the Phyllis and Richard Duesenberg Chair in Christian Ethics at Valparaiso University. He also serves as a Senior Fellow for the Lilly Fellows Program in Humanities and the Arts. Prior to coming to Valparaiso, he taught at Gordon College, where he founded and directed the Jerusalem and Athens Forum honors program and led the Center for Faith and Inquiry.

James Beauregard - Corporeality, the Body, and Moral Knowledge

James Beauregard is a Lecturer in the psychology doctoral program at Rivier University, Nashua, New Hampshire where he teachers neuropsychology, biological bases of behavior and Aging. His research interests are in the fields of neuroethics and personalist philosophy including the intersection of these two areas as they impact our understandings of personhood. He is a member of the National Academy of Neuropsychology, British Personalist Forum, the American Catholic Philosophical Association, and the International Neuroethics Society. 

Tim Mosteller (Commentator) is a professor of philosophy at California Baptist University. He is the author of several books including Theories of Truth: An Introduction, which is dedicated to his teacher and mentor Dallas Willard.

Additional Assets

Steve Porter - The Effects of the Disappearance of Moral Knowledge on Virtue Acquisition

Steve Porter (Presenter) is a Senior Research Fellow and Executive Director of the Martin Institute, and an affiliate Professor of Theology and Spiritual Formation at Biola University. He completed his Ph.D. in philosophy at the University of Southern California under Dallas Willard and M.Phil. in philosophical theology at the University of Oxford under Richard Swinburne. Steve teaches and writes in Christian spiritual formation, the doctrine of sanctification, the integration of psychology and theology, and philosophical theology. He has authored many books, is the editor of The Journal of Spiritual Formation and Soul Care, and is a co-editor of Dallas Willard’s final academic book: The Disappearance of Moral Knowledge

Adam Brown (Commentator) received his M.A. in Philosophy from the Talbot School of Theology and is currently pursuing an M.Div. on a scholarship while serving on staff at a PCA church in Orange, CA. He has a passion for phenomenology, virtue ethics, and spiritual formation from a Reformed perspective. One of his ongoing projects is recovering the biblical and spiritual priority of gentleness in an increasingly postmodern world.

Walter Hopp - Drifting Into Goodness

(We apologize for the sound difficulties. It returns to normal at 2:29) 

Walter Hopp (Presenter) studied philosophy at USC from 1999-2005, where Dallas Willard was his dissertation advisor. According to Walter, “No one has exercised a comparable influence on my philosophical thinking, and I would like to think of my own work as a continuation of Dallas’s own distinctive brand of realist phenomenology.” Walter is a professor of philosophy at Boston University, and in 2020 he published Phenomenology: A Contemporary Introduction, wherein he develops a realist reading of Husserl’s phenomenology in line with Dallas’s interpretation. 

Joe Gorra (Commentator) ideates, innovates, and educates among various types of institutional leaders and practitioners that are attuned to questions of human life and its flourishing in a pluralistic society. His research with Veritas Life Center intersects with habits of mind animated by the Bible, philosophy, theology, history, entrepreneurship, and he regularly enjoys leading communities of learners to read the Bible together out loud. Joe is a contributing author or editor for various publications, including the Journal of Spiritual Formation & Soul Care, the Journal of Markets and Morality, Philosophia Christi, and the Christian Research Journal

This is the third session of the 2023 Colloquium hosted by Westmont College to study and compare the ethical and moral writings of Dallas Willard and Dietrich von Hildebrand.

Dan Sheffler - Mediating Institutions and Hildebrandian Value Response

Dan Sheffler (Presenter) is a Catholic philosopher who specializes in the history of ideas, especially beauty, personhood, and conservatism. He is particularly interested in the history of the Platonic tradition and the personalism of Dietrich von Hildebrand, is an associated scholar with the Hildebrand Project, and teaches philosophy at Memoria College. Dan passionate about classical education, and writes about topics such as beauty, virtue, truth, education, and sanctity. 

Aaron Preston (Commentator) is a Professor of Philosophy at Valparaiso University. He studied classics (B.A.) and theology (M.Th.) before earning his PH.D. in philosophy under Dallas Willard at USC. His early work developed a historical and metaphilosophical critique of the analytic tradition in philosophy, related to its role in what Dallas called “the disappearance of moral knowledge,” and he later helped to complete and publish Dallas’s final academic book on this topic: The Disappearance of Moral Knowledge (Routledge, 2018). 

This is the fifth session of the 2023 Colloquium hosted by Westmont College to study and compare the ethical and moral writings of Dallas Willard and Dietrich von Hildebrand.

Paul Nedelisky - The Engines of the Zeitgeist: How the Old Moral Knowledge Has Been Replaced

This is the final session of the 2023 Colloquium hosted by Westmont College to study and compare the ethical and moral writings of Dallas Willard and Dietrich von Hildebrand. 

Paul Nedelisky (Presenter) is an Assistant Director and a Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture and a professor of philosophy at James Madison University. He is also coauthor, with James Davison Hunter, of Science and the Good: The Tragic Quest for the Foundations of Morality. His research interests center on issues in metaphysics and ethics. His work in metaphysics concerns the nature of the fundamental constituents of reality—the basic building blocks of the world. 

Thomas Albert (Tal) Howard (Commentator) is Professor of Humanities and History and holder of the Phyllis and Richard Duesenberg Chair in Christian Ethics at Valparaiso University. He also serves as a Senior Fellow for the Lilly Fellows Program in Humanities and the Arts. Prior to coming to Valparaiso, he taught at Gordon College, where he founded and directed the Jerusalem and Athens Forum honors program and led the Center for Faith and Inquiry.

Brandon Paradise - Commentator on Hildebrand and the Disappearance of Moral Knowledge